Current Course Offerings

FALL 2018

 

History 05: African Civilization
SubSaharan Africa through the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Human origins, state and non-state systems, the external slave trade, colonialism, resistance to European rule, independence movements, and neocolonialism. SS
Prof. Clifford Campbell
TR 1:10-2:25

History 08: Technology in Modern America
Traces the development of American technology from the preindustrial colonial era until America's emergence as the world's leading industrial power. The interactions between technology and culture, society, politics, and the economy will also be addressed. SS
Prof. John K. Smith
MW 11:10-12:25

History 43: African Americans and the Struggle for Freedom Since 1941
World War II; Cold War at home and abroad; Civil Rights movement; the 1960s: Vietnam, the welfare state and social upheavals; new forms of cultural expression; feminism; rise of neo-conservatism. HU
Prof. Natanya Duncan
MWF 10:10 – 11:00

History 49: The True Road to El Dorado: Colonial Latin America
Examine the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explore the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focus on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortes
MW 11:10-12:25

HIST 075: Chinese Civilization
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Constance Cook
MW 2:35-3:50

History 90: First Year Seminar: Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth-Century Media: A History*
Visual and print media have reflected important changes in gender norms and sexuality in American culture, and they themselves have also been engines of change. This seminar explores the history of gender and sexuality in the 20th century in and through such popular media (including film, television, magazines, and advertising). By using the sources of popular culture, we will seek to understand changing gender ideals, expectations of marriage, sexual identities, and the role of media in American culture and politics. HU
Prof. Monica Najar
TR 13:10 – 2:35
*CAS FYE students only

History 90: First Year Seminar: Graphic Histories*
This course uses non-fiction historical graphic novels as a basis for introducing the college-level study of history. Students will use the graphic accounts to explore basic questions about how historians construct narratives of past events using different kinds of primary source evidence, with a special focus on the challenge of apprehending the lives of those who are left out of the official historical record. The readings cover subjects that range across different regions and periods of world history since 1600, including Native American history, modern English nationalism, the history of sports, the Atlantic Slave Trade, European encroachment in 19th century China, and the history and memory of the Holocaust. This seminar can be counted in place of History 001: Time Travel, for those interested in pursuing a major in History. HU
Prof. John Savage
TR 10:45-12:00
*CAS FYE students only

History 90: First Year Seminar: Cultures and Experiences of Africans and Africana People*
This interdisciplinary course traces the cultures and achievements of Africans and people of African origins. It emphasizes how their similarities and differences shape their identities. HU
Prof. Kwame Essien
TR 9:20-10:35
*CAS FYE students only

History 90: First Year Seminar: Origins of Modern Democracy*
This course considers the promise and perils of democracy by investigating the origins of modern democratic government in seventeenth-century England and America. Over the course of the semester, students will discover the the power of historical analysis in a rapidly changing world. History will emerge as a vital tool for confronting human diversity and understanding how societies are transformed. Skills acquired include causal analysis, empathy, interpretation, source criticism, information management, digital methods, public engagement, and argumentative writing.
Prof. William Bulman
TR 2:35-3:50
*CAS FYE students only

History 90: Wild Wild West
Introduction to the American West as both region and process.  Investigates the diverse populations living in the west, including Native Americans, Mexicans, American settlers, miners, and cowboys, and Chinese railroad workers.  Explore the process of first Spanish/Mexican and Russian and then U.S. expansion into the region and the rise of the myth of the wild west.  Themes includes the evolution of land use, immigration, cultural life, social communities and changing technologies. HU
Prof. Michelle LeMaster
MW 11:10-12:25

History 96: Scandal and Sensation in Modern China
In this course students will read provocative literature and watch controversial movies from China in the last 100 years.  The objectives are to probe the gray areas of morality, propriety, and legality; to evaluate the competing forces of speech and censure; and to engage in broader debate about public culture.  All materials are available in English. CBE Global, HU
Prof. Tom Chen
MW 11:10 – 12:25

History 101: Histories of Globalization
Critical historical perspectives on current debates around “globalization” and the varied paths and responses to modernity, using recent scholarship associated with the New Global History. The “Rise of the West” paradigm, Industrial Revolution and modernization theory; creation of global financial markets, nation-building and New Imperialism; Great Depression and World Wars as global historical events; postwar decolonization, Cold War and emergence of North-South relations; impact of consumerism, movements for women's rights, ethnic nationalism and religious fundamentalist movements in tradition-bound societies. HU
Prof. Ugur Pece
TR 10:45-12:00

History 110: American Military History
The American military tradition from colonial times to the present. America’s wars and the development and operation of military institutions within the political, economic, ideological, and technological milieu of American society. SS
Prof. Gregg Pearson
TR 2:35-3:50

History 124: Women in America
Roles of women in American society from colonial to present times: attitudes toward women, female sexuality, women's work, and feminism. CBE Diversity, SS
Prof. Gail Cooper
TR 9:20-10:35

History 149: Narcos: The Global Drug Wars
Tobacco, sugar, coffee, opium, marijuana, cocaine. From Columbus’s encounter with the New World to the rise and demise of Pablo Escobar and “El Chapo” Guzmán, drugs have been coveted global commodities. Through readings, discussions, and films, this course examines the history of drug production, drug trafficking, and the so-called “war on drugs” in Latin America. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortes
MW 2:35-3:50

History 154: The Holocaust: History and Meaning
The Nazi Holocaust in its historical, political and religious setting. Emphasis upon the moral, cultural and theological issues raised by the Holocaust. CBE Global, HU
Prof. Nitzan Lebovic
TR 10:45-12:00

History 306: Internship to Public History
Professionally supervised work in a museum, historical society, archive, or other historical agency. Written journal or report evaluating the experience is required. Permission of department chair required. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. May not be counted toward the major requirement of 12 hours of courses numbered 303 or higher.
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
TBA

History 337: History and Community Memory
This fall HIST 337 will explore the vibrant retail history of South Bethlehem. What businesses have served residents and Lehigh students near campus since the 19140s? Who ran those small shops, bars, markets, and theaters?  Through walking tours, oral history, and research we'll build a digital tour of the Southside business district, and the shine a light on the people who lived, worked and played here. SS
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
T 1:10-4:00

History 340: Japanese Industrialization
Explores economic growth in the traditional economy, the rise of an entrepreneurial class, the importation of western technology, and the social, political and economic institutions which support industrial society since the early 19th century. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Gail Cooper
TR 1:10-2:25

History 354: History of Fascism
This course examines the historical and philosophical roots of European right-wing extremism, such as Italian and French Fascism, German Nazism, Austro-Hungarian Conservative Revolution, and other forms of radical nationalism. CBE Global, HU
Prof. Nitzan Lebovic
T 4:10-7:00

History 401: Historical Research
Techniques of research in history: training in the critical handling of documentary materials, in measuring the value of evidence, and in formal presentation of the results of research. Students will write an original research paper using primary materials. Required of all graduate students in history.
Prof. William Bulman
R 4:10-7:00

History 438: Techniques in Public History
Designed to introduce students to a variety of public history techniques. Instructor will focus on one of the following topics each term: archives, documentary film, exhibit design, historical editing, material culture, oral history.
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
TBA

History 442: Readings in Twentieth Century American History
Study in small groups under the guidance of a faculty member of the literature of the 20th century.
Prof. Tamara Myers
W 4:10-7:00

 

**Documentary Storymaking 396: Documentary Research and Production
With an emphasis on documentary research methods, students will explore resources at local archives and online. Film screenings and discussions will highlight aesthetics, ethical and legal considerations, story development and cinematic attributes. Students will be given hands-on instruction on the fundamentals of video production and post production. The course will culminate in the production of a short documentary highlighting a local topic or issue.*The intent of the course is to help the undergraduate LVAIC minor in Documentary Storymaking and to satisfy the capstone project for the American Studies Graduate Certificate in Documentary Film.
Prof. Julia Maserjian
M 1:10-4:00

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SPRING 2018

History 22: Roman History
The development of civilization from paleolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great.The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic, and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Michael Clark
MWF 10:10 – 1:00

History 42: Big Dreams, Big Bucks, Big Trouble: United States, 1865-1941
America's transformation into an industrial and global power from Reconstruction after the Civil War to the Great Depression; includes social, political, and cultural developments. SS
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
MW 11:10 – 12:00
, F 11:10-12:00 OR 1:10-2:00

History 49: History of Latin America
Examine the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explore the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focus on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortes
MW 11:10-12:25

History 95: Time Travel: How to Make History
Students discover the power of historical analysis in a rapidly changing world by investigating a series of pressing contemporary problems. History emerges as a vital tool for confronting human diversity and understanding how societies are transformed. Skills acquired include causal analysis, empathy, interpretation, source criticism, information management, digital methods, public engagement, and argumentative writing.
Students must be Arts and Sciences freshmen, sophomores, or junior/senior History majors in order to enroll. This is a required course in the new History major. It is also meant to expose non-majors to the excitement of historical inquiry. The theme of the course for spring 2018 will be "The Promise and Perils of Democracy." Students who took HIST 097 in Fall 2017 (Democracy's Rise and Fall) are encouraged to join the class. There will be no duplication of readings, assignments, or classroom formats. SS
Prof. William Bulman
TR 10:45 – 12:00

History 97: Illicit Sex in America
This course examines sex that was deemed illicit throughout American history. In particular, this course investigates: who decided what was illicit; how political and economic realities, as well as ideas about gender, race, class, and religion, shaped definitions of illicit sex; the ways in which ideas about normative sex were maintained, reinforced, and challenged; and how definitions of illicit sex changed over time. Major topics to be discussed include: adultery, interracial sex, prostitution, polygamy, same-sex desire, and transsexuality. HU
Prof. Jessie Vander Heide
TR 2:35-3:50

History 98: African Americans from Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter
This course seeks to explore the quest of African Americans for citizenship through an examination of the rise of the Modern Civil Rights Movement to the burgeoning Black Lives Matter Movement.  Students will explore the origins of both movements, well-known and lesser-known protests and activists from the 1940s through the 2010s, and examine how these movements intersected with the contemporaneous feminist, gay rights, and anti-war movements of the last seventy years. HU
Prof. Natanya Duncan
TR 9:20-10:35

History 117: Pioneering Women: Women in Science, Medicine and Engineering
This course analyses the careers of professional women in science, medicine and engineering, principally in the United States. It examines historical barriers to training and entry into these professions; cultural stereotypes that shape women’s options; women’s participation in innovation in their fields; their concern for work/life balance; and their contribution to clients and patients, both male and female. It focuses on three locations of professional work: the laboratory, the clinic, and the job site. SS
Prof. Gail Cooper
MWF 11:10 – 12:00

History 118: History of Modern Medicine
Introduction to Western medical history from the 18th century to the present day. Students will explore patient/practitioner relationships, examine changing ideas concerning health, sickness, and disease, chart changes in hospital care and medical education, and tackle topics such as eugenics, medical experimentation, and health insurance. HU
Prof. John Smith
MW 12:45-2:00

History 120: Revolutionary America
Origins and development of the American republic from 1750 through the adoption of the Federal Constitution. SS
Prof. Michelle LeMaster
TR 1:10-2:25

History 170: The Last Samurai
Explores the revolutionary character of the political upheaval in 1868 that led to the fall of the ruling shogan and the dissolution of the elite samurai class.Examines both the causes of these major political and social changes, and their continuing impact upon Japanese culture and society. CBE Global, HU
Prof. Gail Cooper
TR 9:10-10:00

History 195: The Global 60s: "Takin' it to the Streets"
Welcome to the Days of Hope and Rage! The Global Sixties explores that watershed decade of unprecedented social and political action, change, and backlash, focusing on social movements (students, civil rights/Black Power, feminisms, environmentalism), national liberation struggles, and global counterculture. We will examine the ideologies, tactics, and meanings of 1960s movement culture and new subcultures related to Rock and Roll, sexual freedom, and illicit drugs. Course materials will include the stuff of the 60s, including visual, textual, and audio sources. SS
Prof. Tamara Myers
TR 2:35-3:50

History 196: How Black Women Made America
This course will introduce students to the significant themes and events that have shaped the African American women's historical experience from slavery to the present. We will examine the social, political, and economic meaning of freedom for women of African descent. HU
Prof. Natanya Duncan
TR 10:45-12:00

History 196: The Politics of Racism and Anti-Semitism
Racism and anti-Semitism gained scientific and ideological reputation during the 19th century. Our course will examine the roots of such concepts in biology, ethnology, nationalism, aesthetics and culture. It will trace the development of “race” from the liberalism of 1848 to the Holocaust, and explore economic and scientific racism next to colonialist abuse and genocide. SS
Prof. Nitzan Lebovic
TR 10:45-12:00

History 197: Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: A History of Illness and Wellness
What are myths about diseases in Africa? How does the world respond to health crises, including HIV/AIDS, Ebola and others? What are African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implication? This course explores various health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans—missionaries, colonial officials, NGOs etc. Students final reports/papers will perform a post-mortem on Africa, to critically trace and analyze how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed. CBE Global, HU
Prof. Kwame Essien
TR 9:20-10:35

History 198: Narcos: The Global Drug Wars
Tobacco, sugar, coffee, opium, marijuana, cocaine. From Columbus’s encounter with the New World to the rise and demise of Pablo Escobar and El Chapo Guzmin, drugs have been coveted global commodities. Through readings, discussions, and films, this course examines the history of drug production, drug trafficking, and the so-called “war on drugs in Latin America. CBE Global, GS, HU
Prof. Barbara Zepeda Cortes
MW 2:35-3:50

History 302: The Capstone Experience
Culmination of the major. Working collectively on a broadly-defined theme, students master the tools of historical inquiry by developing and completing individual research projects that engage primary and secondary sources. Theme varies with instructor. Departmental permission required. HU, SS
Prof. William Bulman
T 1:10-4:00

History 306: Internship in Public History
Professionally supervised work in a museum, historical society, archive, or other historical agency. Written journal or report evaluating the experience is required. Permission of department chair required. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. May not be counted toward the major requirement of 12 hours of courses numbered 303 or higher.
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
TBA

History 320: History of North American Indians
The history of American Indians from before European contact to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the diversity of native peoples of eastern North America and how patterns of interaction between native Americans and Euro-Americans have changed over time. Discussion format, research paper. HU
Prof. Michelle LeMaster
TR 9:20-10:35

History 338: Techniques in Public History
Designed to introduce students to a variety of public history techniques. Instructor will focus on one of the following topics each term: archives, documentary film, exhibit design, historical editing, material culture, oral history. HU
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
TBA

History 352: History of Total War
This seminar examines the gradual rise of the idea of total war from the religious and civil wars of the 17th century, through the French Revolution, the Napoleonic War, the American Civil War, the two World Wars, the Cold War, and The War on Terror. We will examine the difference between war as political means and modern warfare as the very ends of politics, religion, and culture. HU
Prof. Nitzan Lebovic
TR 1:10-2:25

History 404: Readings in the History of the Atlantic World, 1500-1900
Core readings offering a comparative and integrative approach to studying the development of nations, economic systems and trade, colonization, and cultural encounters among the people of Europe, Africa, and the Americas. CBE Global, HU
Prof. John Savage
MW 6:10-9:00 PM

History 438: Techniques in Public History
Designed to introduce students to a variety of public history techniques. Instructor will focus on one of the following topics each term: archives, documentary film, exhibit design, historical editing, material culture, oral history.
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
TBA

History 442: Readings in Twentieth Century American History
Study in small groups under the guidance of a faculty member of the literature of the 20th century.
Prof. John Pettegrew
W 4:10-7:00

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