Current Course Offerings

 

FALL 2019

HIST 001 Time Travel: How to Make History
Students discover the power of historical analysis in a rapidly changing world by investigating a series of pressing contemporary problems. History emerges as a vital tool for confronting human diversity and understanding how societies are transformed. Skills acquired include causal analysis, empathy, interpretation, source criticism, information management, digital methods, public engagement, and argumentative writing.

*This semester's theme is Graphic Histories and uses non-fiction historical graphic novels as a basis for introducing the college-level study of history. Students will use the graphic accounts to explore basic questions about how historians construct narratives of past events using different kinds of primary source evidence, with a special focus on the challenge of apprehending the lives of those who are left out of the official historical record. The readings cover subjects that range across different regions and periods of world history since 1600, including Native American history, modern English nationalism, the history of sports, the Atlantic Slave Trade, European encroachment in 19th century China, and the history and memory of the Holocaust. HU, SS
Prof. John Savage
TR 3:00-4:15

 

HIST 005: African Civilization
SubSaharan Africa through the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Human origins, state and non-state systems, the external slave trade, colonialism, resistance to European rule, independence movements, and neocolonialism. BUG, SS
Prof. Kwame Essien
TR 9:20-10:35

 

HIST 007 Technology in America's Industrial Age 4 Credits
Traces the development of American technology from the preindustrial colonial era until America's emergence as the world's leading industrial power. The interactions between technology and culture, society, politics, and the economy will also be addressed. SS
Prof. John K. Smith
MW 10:45-12:00

 

HIST 015 Three English Revolutions
The Protestant Reformation, the Civil Wars, and the Glorious Revolution, from Henry the Eighth to John Locke. Examines how three bloody conflicts gave birth to the first modern society. Explores the origins of empire, capitalism, secularization, nationalism, and democracy.

BUG, HU
Prof. John Parks
MW 12:10-1:25

 

HIST 021 Greek History
The development of civilization from paleolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great.The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic, and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions. BUG, SS
Prof. Christina Villarreal
TR 1:35-2:50

 

HIST 025 Pirates of the Caribbean and Other Rogues of the Atlantic World
Introduction to the history of the Atlantic World, through the lens of piracy and seafaring. Interactions between Europe, Africa, and North and South America, 1442-1825. BUG, SS
Prof. Michelle LeMaster
MW 9:20-10:35

 

HIST 049 The True Road to El Dorado: Colonial Latin America
Examine the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explore the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focus on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortes
TR 9:20-10:35

 

HIST 075 Chinese Civilization
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective. BUG, SS
Prof. Constance Cook
MW 1:35-2:50

 

HIST 090 First Year Seminar: Black Radical Thought*
This course provides a critical historical interrogation of what is called "the Black Radical Tradition." It is designed to introduce students to some of the major currents in the history of black radical thought, action and organizing throughout the Black Diaspora.  It relies on social, political and intellectual history to examine the efforts of black people who have sought not merely social reform, but the fundamental restructuring political, economic and social relations. We will define and evaluate radicalism in the shifting context of liberation struggles. We will explore dissenting visions of social organization and alternative definitions of citizenship, progress, and freedom. We will confront the meaning of the intersection of race gender, class, and sexuality in social movements. HU
Prof. Natanya Duncan
MW 10:45-12:00
*CAS FYE students only

 

HIST 090 First Year Seminar: Wild Wild West*
Introduction to the American West as both region and process.  Investigates the diverse populations living in the west, including Native Americans, Mexicans, American settlers, miners, and cowboys, and Chinese railroad workers.  Explore the process of first Spanish/Mexican and Russian and then U.S. expansion into the region and the rise of the myth of the wild west.  Themes includes the evolution of land use, immigration, cultural life, social communities and changing technologies. HU
Prof. Michelle LeMaster
MW 12:10-1:25

*CAS FYE students only
 

HIST 095 Empire, War, and Resistance in the Middle East
During the past two hundred years, empires fought over the control of strategic trade routes and natural resources in the Middle East. The wars they waged redrew the boundaries in the region and sowed the seeds of the conflicts in Palestine, Iraq, and Syria. At the same time, Middle Eastern men and women resisted the foreign occupation and domestic dictators alike. In this course, by studying sources such as fiction, photographs and films, you will explore the region‚ its diverse past, and investigate its legacy today. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Ugur Peçe
TR 10:45-12:00

 

HIST 096 Understanding Hong Kong
This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world.  The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research.  Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English. BUG, HU
Prof. Tom Chen
MW 12:10-1:25

 

HIST 124 Women in America
Roles of women in American society from colonial to present times: attitudes toward women, female sexuality, women's work, and feminism. BUD, SS
Prof. Monica Najar
TR 3:00-4:15

 

HIST 130 African American History
Blacks in America from the first importation of Africans to the implementation of civil rights laws. West African origins, slave trade, slavery, free blacks and emancipation and study of Reconstruction, segregation, urbanization, and the struggle for racial equality. BUD, SS
Prof. Natanya Duncan
MW 1:35-2:50

 

HIST 136 Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction
American abolitionism and the origins of the Civil War; the Second American Revolution; Reconstruction and its sequel. SS
Prof. Monica Najar
TR10:45-12:00

 

HIST 149: Narcos: The Global Drug Wars
Tobacco, sugar, coffee, opium, marijuana, cocaine. From Columbus’s encounter with the New World to the rise and demise of Pablo Escobar and “El Chapo” Guzmán, drugs have been coveted global commodities. Through readings, discussions, and films, this course examines the history of drug production, drug trafficking, and the so-called “war on drugs” in Latin America. BUG, SS
Prof. Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortes
TR 1:35-2:50

 

HIST 176: Keeping Africa and Africans Healthy: A History of Illness and Wellness*
What are the myths about diseases in Africa and how does the world respond to health crises there? What are the African healing traditions? What is the history of global health in Africa and its implications for illness and wellness? This course explores health interventions and initiatives by Africans and non-Africans including missionaries, colonial officials, and NGOs. Students’ final papers will perform a “post-mortem” on Africa, critically tracing how efforts to control, manage and eradicate diseases have succeeded or failed. HU
Prof. Kwame Essien
TR 1:35-2:50

*New Course, Pending Faculty Approval

 

HIST 336 Bethlehem and the Lehigh Valley
Local history focusing on Native American communities, Moravian settlement, natural resources, industrial firms, immigration and ethnic communities, organized labor, housing patterns and urban sprawl, high-tech industry, and tourism. Includes an analysis of techniques used in presenting these topics to the public. SS
Prof. John K. Smith
MW 1:35-2:50

 

HIST 348 The British Empire and the Modern World
Examines the empire and its central role in the process of globalization between the 16th and 20th centuries. Topics include exploration, state-building, war, multinational corporations, industry, international finance, missionaries, racism, and independence movements. BUG

Prof. William Bulman
T 1:35-4:15

 

HIST 395: Leaving Home: Migrants and Refugees of the Middle East
Why do people leave their hometowns? Once in a foreign land, how do they remember their places of origin? By taking a long-term historical perspective and highlighting the Middle East's global connections, this course explores migration as a central phenomenon in the formation of the Middle East and modern world. Topics include wars and refugees, population exchanges and transfers, voluntary and forced migration, assimilation and integration, and exile and remembrance. We will discuss these themes by studying diverse sources such as fiction, poetry, memoirs, photography, and film. BUG, HU
Prof. Ugur Peçe
R 1:35-4:15

 

HIST 442: Readings in Twentieth Century American History
Study in small groups under the guidance of a faculty member of the literature of the 20th century.
TBA
T 4:25-7:05

 

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SPRING 2019

HIST 001 Time Travel: How to Make History
Students discover the power of historical analysis in a rapidly changing world by investigating a series of pressing contemporary problems. History emerges as a vital tool for confronting human diversity and understanding how societies are transformed. Skills acquired include causal analysis, empathy, interpretation, source criticism, information management, digital methods, public engagement, and argumentative writing. The theme of the course for spring 2019 will be "The Promise and Perils of Democracy." The content of this course does not overlap with the content of HIST 097 (Democracy's Rise and Fall), which was taught in fall 2017. SS
Prof. William Bulman
MW 12:45-2:00

HIST 005 (AAS 005) African Civilization
SubSaharan Africa through the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Human origins, state and nonstate systems, the external slave trade, colonialism, resistance to European rule, independence movements, and neocolonialism. CBE Global, SS
Prof. TBA
MW 11:10-12:25

HIST 022 (CLSS 022) Roman History
The development of civilization from paleolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great.The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic, and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Christie Villareal
TR 1:10 – 2:25

HIST 041 The Making and Breaking of the United States
Native American cultures; European settlement; development of slavery and free labor systems; the Revolution; founding of the new nation; 19th century social, economic, cultural, and political development; Civil War. SS
Prof. TBA
MWF 10:10 – 11:00

HIST 42 Big Dreams, Big Bucks, Big Trouble: United States, 1865-1941
America's transformation into an industrial and global power from Reconstruction after the Civil War to the Great Depression; includes social, political, and cultural developments. SS
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
MW 1:10 – 2:00
, F 11:10-12:00 OR 1:10-2:00

HIST 050 (GS 050, LAS 050) Heroes, Dictators, and Revolutionaries: Latin America since Independence
Examines the 200-year-long struggle of Latin American peoples to gain political representation, economic equality, and social justice. Explores key historical events in Latin America from the movement for independence in the early nineteenth century to today's modern societies. Topics include the wars of independence, the rule of caudillos, foreign military interventions, export economies, populism, social revolutions, the Cold War era, state terror and military dictatorships, and the war on drugs. CBE Global, SS
Prof. Maria Barbara Zepeda Cortes
TR 9:20-10:35

HIST 095 Empire, War, and Resistance in the Middle East
During the past two hundred years, empires fought over the control of strategic trade routes and natural resources in the Middle East. The wars they waged redrew the boundaries in the region and sowed the seeds of the conflicts in Palestine, Iraq, and Syria. At the same time, Middle Eastern men and women resisted the foreign occupation and domestic dictators alike. In this course, by studying sources such as fiction, photographs and films, you will explore the region‚ its diverse past and investigate its legacy today. SS
Prof. Ugur Pece
TR 1:10-2:25

**This provisional course may count towards both the War, Empire, and Revolution and Global Connections tracks.

HIST 098 (LAS 098) American Rebellions, Revolutions, and Republics
This course traces the underlying causes and the consequences of political movements—rebellions, revolutions, and the creation of republics in North America, the Caribbean, and South America from the beginning of European colonization through the American Civil War. Through a series of case studies, it examines the rise and fall of American empires, and the historical transition from the pre-modern to the modern world from the perspective of European-descended colonists, Native Americans, and African slaves. Our goal is to analyze the differences between rebellions and revolutions, why they transpired in specific places at specific times, and how/why new sovereign polities emerged from European empires. Topics include colonial rebellions/warfare, American Constitutional debates, western borderlands empires/republics, and nationalism and sovereignty. HU
Prof. Austin Stewart
MW 8:45-10:00

**This provisional course may count towards both the War, Empire, and Revolution and Global Connections tracks.
 

HIST 101 (GS 101) Histories of Globalization
Critical historical perspectives on current debates around “globalization” and the varied paths and responses to modernity, using recent scholarship associated with the New Global History. The “Rise of the West” paradigm, Industrial Revolution and modernization theory; creation of global financial markets, nationbuilding and New Imperialism; Great Depression and World Wars as global historical events; postwar decolonization, Cold War and emergence of North-South relations; impact of consumerism, movements for women's rights, ethnic nationalism and religious fundamentalist movements in traditionbound societies. CBE Global, HU
Prof. Ugur Pece
TR 10:45-12:00

HIST 118 (HMS 118, STS 118) History of Modern Medicine
Introduction to Western medical history from the 18th century to the present day. Students will explore patient/practitioner relationships, examine changing ideas concerning health, sickness, and disease, chart changes in hospital care and medical education, and tackle topics such as eugenics, medical experimentation, and health insurance. HU
Prof. John Smith
MW 11:10 – 12:25

HIST 125 (HMS 125, WGSS 125) Does Sex have a History? The History of Sexuality in the United States
Explores the history of sexuality in the United States from the colonial era to the present. While sexuality can appear timeless and stable, sexual ideologies, categories, and behaviors have consistently evolved and have transformed society in the process. The class pays special attention to relationships between sexuality, race, class, and the state, as well as how law, medicine, and the media have shaped sexual identities and experiences. In so doing, the class develops sophisticated readers of historical and contemporary cultures. HU

Prof. Monica Najar
TR 1:10-12:25

HIST 195 The 1970s: "Stayin' Alive"
Welcome to the hangover: a forgettable decade of questionable clothing, hair, and music. Despite the bad rap, the 1970s constitutes a transformative, pivotal era that helps explain our postmodern world. This course examines the rollercoaster decade from Woodstock to disco; the end of Vietnam to the Iranian hostage crisis; Watergate to the rise of Reagan; Roe V. Wade to the Moral Majority; the oil crisis to Three Mile Island, and personal fulfillment to Jaws. HU
Prof. Tamara Myers
TR 10:45-12:00

**This provisional course may count towards both the Religion, Thought, and Culture and Global Connections tracks.
 

HIST 198 Modern Chinese Civilization
This course is an introduction to modern Chinese civilization from the end of the last dynasty, the Qing, to present times.  Course objectives include understanding China's transition from dynastic empire to global powerhouse, reading and analyzing both primary and secondary materials, and debating critically on topics of broad concern in politics, economics, and culture. HU
Prof. Thomas Chen
MW 2:35-3:50
**This
provisional course may count towards the Religion, Thought, and Culture track.
 

HIST 302 The Capstone Experience
Culmination of the major. Working collectively on a broadly-defined theme, students master the tools of historical inquiry by developing and completing individual research projects that engage primary and secondary sources. Theme varies with instructor. Departmental permission required. HU, WRIT
Prof. Michelle LeMaster
MW 2:35-3:50

HIST 306 Internship in Public History
Professionally supervised work in a museum, historical society, archive, or other historical agency. Written journal or report evaluating the experience is required. Permission of department chair required. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. May not be counted toward the major requirement of 12 hours of courses numbered 303 or higher.
Prof. Kim Carrell-Smith
TBA

HIST 315 (ES 315) American Environmental History
Relationship between Americans and their natural environment from the colonial period to the present: impact of European settlement, attitudes toward wilderness, role of technological development, rise of preservation and conservation movements, establishment of national parks, recent environmental protection legislation. SS, STS
Prof. John Smith
MW 2:35-3:50

HIST 396 Documentary Film and History
This course examines the relationship of documentary film to the production of historical knowledge. Through secondary literature and visual sources the course explores the genre, its origins and its development into a powerful medium for public history and protest. Students will analyse and write scripts, and produce podcasts and short documentaries. This course is it serves as an elective for the History, Doc Storymaking and Film Studies minors, and the AMST Graduate Certificate in Documentary Film. SS
Prof. Tamara Myers
TR 2:35-3:50

**This provisional course may count towards the Public and Digital History track.
 

HIST 397 Countercultures in American History
Counterculture in the United States is often associated with the hippies of the 1960s yet the country has a rich historical tradition of countercultural thought and expression. This course establishes the defining principles and characteristics of counterculture and examines how actors within the modern tradition -- from Transcendentalism to Punk -- have critiqued and ultimately influenced mainstream American society.  Students will explore innovations in art, spirituality, and political and social theory through close-readings of  critical essays, literary works, art, film, and even song-lyrics through the lenses of intellectual and cultural history. SS
Prof. Amanda Brown
TR 1:10-2:25

**This provisional course may count towards the Religion, Thought, and Culture track.
 

HIST 495 Readings in Modern European History
The purpose of this course is to introduce you to key readings in modern European historiography. The seminar will integrate some classic historiography (the first two thirds of the course) with recent additions (the last third). We will cover concepts and ideas such as Micro-History, History of Concepts, Cultural History, history of labor and technology, secularism and religion, modern and post-modern. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to key readings in modern European historiography. The seminar will integrate some classic historiography (the first two thirds of the course) with recent additions (the last third). We will cover concepts and ideas such as Micro-History, History of Concepts, Cultural History, history of labor and technology, secularism and religion, modern and post-modern.
Prof. Nitzan Lebovic
T 4:10-7:00

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